Detec­tion of anti­bod­ies against SARS-CoV‑2

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Detec­tion of anti­bod­ies against SARS-CoV‑2

Devel­op­ment of an auto­mated flow-based chemi­lu­min­es­cence microar­ray immun­oas­say (CL-MIA) for the detec­tion of anti­bod­ies against SARS-CoV‑2 RBD/spike pro­tein and N pro­tein in human serum and plasma in less than 8 min with high spe­cificity and sensitivity.

In the face of the COVID-19 pan­demic, the need for rapid ser­o­lo­gical tests that allow mul­ti­plex­ing emerged, as anti­body sero­pos­it­iv­ity can instruct about indi­vidual immunity after an infec­tion with SARS-CoV‑2 or after vac­cin­a­tion. As many com­mer­cially avail­able anti­body tests are either time-con­sum­ing or tend to pro­duce false neg­at­ive or false pos­it­ive res­ults when only one anti­gen is con­sidered, we developed an auto­mated, flow-based chemi­lu­min­es­cence microar­ray immun­oas­say (CL-MIA) that allows for the detec­tion of anti­bod­ies to SARS-CoV‑2 RBD/spike pro­tein and N pro­tein in human serum and plasma in less than 8 min. The CoV­Rapid CL-MIA was tested with SARS-CoV‑2 ser­o­logy pos­it­ive or neg­at­ive samples, res­ult­ing in 100% dia­gnostic spe­cificity and 100% dia­gnostic sens­it­iv­ity, thus out­com­pet­ing other com­mer­cial tests run on the same sample set.

Auto­mated, flow-based chemi­lu­min­es­cence microar­ray immun­oas­say for the rapid mul­ti­plex detec­tion of IgG anti­bod­ies to SARS-CoV‑2 in human serum and plasma (CoV­Rapid CL-MIA)

Klüp­fel J, Koros RC, Dehne K, Ungerer M, Würstle S, Maut­ner J, Feuer­herd M, Protzer U, Hay­den O, Els­ner M, Seidel M. Auto­mated, flow-based chemi­lu­min­es­cence microar­ray immun­oas­say for the rapid mul­ti­plex detec­tion of IgG anti­bod­ies to SARS-CoV‑2 in human serum and plasma (CoV­Rapid CL-MIA). Anal Bioanal Chem. 2021:1–14. doi: 10.1007/s00216-021–03315‑6.

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Richard­son et al., SARS-COV2 mutant-spe­cific T cells and neut­ral­iz­ing anti­bod­ies after vac­cin­a­tion and up to 1 year after infec­tion. pub­lished in MedRX­ive on Sept 14, 2021; MS ID#: MEDRXIV/2021/262725; https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.09.07.21262725v1

We found that SARS-CoV‑2 delta mutant anti­body neut­ral­isa­tion was reduced com­pared to the Wuhan wild type (wt), as assessed in a novel inhib­i­tion assay with a fin­ger prick blood drop. Strong T cell responses were present against wt and mutant SARS-CoV2 vari­ants, includ­ing the delta (B.1.617.2) strain, in fully vac­cin­ated indi­vidu­als, whereas they were weaker 1 year after nat­ural infec­tion. Hence, immune responses after vac­cin­a­tion are stronger com­pared to those after nat­ur­ally occur­ring infec­tion, point­ing out the need of vac­cines to over­come the pandemic.